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February 12,2013

With Valentine’s Day right around the corner, I’ve decided to dedicate today’s blog post to helping you find a job you love.

photo by Michal Marcol

“Valentine’s Heart” photo by Michal Marcol

Who doesn’t want to love their work?

Today I am sharing some useful content I recently discovered from a variety of career blogs & websites to help you land your dream job:

  • 10 smart phone apps that help you land a career  — Who couldn’t use a little help from the latest technology when searching for a new job?  Kelsey Libert compiles an impressive list of helpful apps. Even just one of these smart phone apps may provide you with much needed support during your job search. 
  • Infographic on Interviewing — I was really struck by the startling numbers embedded in this infographic. BrianLee from LifeHack.org put this infographic together (be sure to scroll down the page a bit for the full view). The biggest shocker, “65% of bosses said clothes could be the deciding factor between two similar candidates.” Yikes make sure you  havea suitable interview outfit and avoid any fashion faux pas. It would be terrible to lose a job opportunity due to attire!
  • 10 Personal Branding Trends of 2013 — When you think about how to stand out from the pack, consider these ideas by William Arruda on how to best cultivate your own brand. Of course I am a fan of content curation… These ideas are insightful and timely.
  • 13 Tips to Help You Discover Your Purpose — Still unsure which direction to go to find a job you can love?  Check out this blog post from Under30Careers by Melissa Krivacheck. She offers a logical but refreshing approach to thinking about your preferences across different aspects of your life to help you determine your work passion.

As you pursue your life’s purpose, just remember not to neglect your personal relationships.  Happy Valentine’s Day.

photo by Michal Marcol

July 7, 2011

Today I would like to refer you to an article from BusinessInsider.com, entitled, “20 Ways to Ruin Your Chances During a Job Interview,” by Jessica Liebman.  I found it to be a highly amusing yet useful post and recommend anyone currently in the process of job interviewing take a look at it. While many of the recommendations are common sense (I hope!), it is always good to be reminded of these points from someone in a hiring position.

While the prospect of interviewing for that new job you want is exciting, chances are it is also anxiety producing. Most people find job interviews stressful. There is the fear of the unknown — Who will I be meeting with? What kind of interview questions will I be asked? Will it be a group interview or one-on-one? Will I be asked to answer case studies or do any kind of problem solving on the spot?  Your best bet is preparation. I suggest you read this excellent post by Karen Burns from  US News & World Report, Money, entitled, 21 Ways to Avoid Job Interview Anxiety before your next job interview.

Here is a list of six must ask interview questions courtesy of Monster.com. I think most of the questions are applicable to any position within the nonprofit sector. However, for question #5, I would encourage you to ask the following instead, “What are the organization’s five year budget and fundraising projections?” In addition, I think it is also very helpful to ask your interviewer, “How would you describe the work environment?” It will shed a lot of light on what it is like to work there and give you a better idea whether the office culture will work for you.

Perhaps you may have heard the stories of the infamous silicon valley job interviews that are known for throwing curveball interview questions to applicants with difficult brainteasers. I’ve also heard the one about the Peace Corps interview where a window is locked and the interviewer casually asks the applicant to open the window just to see how they will handle it. What should you do if you are thrown one of these “curveball” interview questions? Don’t panic. I suggest you read Karen Burns’ useful post “The Truth Behind Those Crazy Interview Questions” posted on US News and World Report money.